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I try to introduce at least one or two new game elements with every level to keep players on their toes, here are some fireballs in World 1-7. Only one more level using this tileset!

I try to introduce at least one or two new game elements with every level to keep players on their toes, here are some fireballs in World 1-7. Only one more level using this tileset!

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Some early tile artwork and things you can expect to run into while playing the game.

Some early tile artwork and things you can expect to run into while playing the game.

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Another level editing shot. Ogmo Editor stretches objects when they are resized, but since the platforms in Pig Flip us a special method for tiling, they look a bit funny when in the editor.
This is fine though, since they still look and function correct when the game is running. The level editor is just a tool for me to lay out objects, it does not need to represent what the game actually looks like while running.

Another level editing shot. Ogmo Editor stretches objects when they are resized, but since the platforms in Pig Flip us a special method for tiling, they look a bit funny when in the editor.

This is fine though, since they still look and function correct when the game is running. The level editor is just a tool for me to lay out objects, it does not need to represent what the game actually looks like while running.

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Public Static Const

public static const MAX_SPEED:Number = 500;
public static const GRAVITY:Number = 1000;
public static const GRAVITY_DROP:Number = 2400;
public static const JUMP_X:Number = 120;
public static const JUMP_Y:Number = 400;
public static const MAX_BOUNCE:Number = 600;
public static const FRICTION:Number = 900;
public static const MIN_WALL_FRICTION:Number = 600;
public static const MAX_WALL_FRICTION:Number = 2000;
public static const JUMP_GRACE:int = 8;
public static const SPIN_SLOW:Number = 0.08;
public static const SPIN_FAST:Number = 0.16;
public static const MIN_SPIN:Number = Math.PI;
public static const MAX_SPIN:Number = Math.PI * 5;
public static const LIFT_JUMP_RATE:Number = 0.9;
public static const OFFSET_Y:int = 10;
public static const MIN_BOUNCE_VEL_X:int = 100;
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Anonymous asked: What IDE are you using for Pig Flip? I'm pretty sure you're using Flashpunk, but I also figured you might be using Adobe's Flash software based on the title screen picture you posted.

I’m using FlashPunk, which isn’t technically an IDE, just a code library. The artwork looks like Flash because it is actually drawn in Flash, I just export it as bitmaps before I bring it into FlashPunk.

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Testing with the FlashPunk console on, which allows me to track memory and entities, see hitboxes, pause the game, frame-step, and move things around as I please.

Testing with the FlashPunk console on, which allows me to track memory and entities, see hitboxes, pause the game, frame-step, and move things around as I please.

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Anonymous asked: You use Ogmo Editor for levels but what do you use to build the tile maps? What cool tricks have you picked up over time?

Good question! For this game I’m doing the art in Flash (which isn’t really good for tile-based stuff), so I just draw a block of terrain and divide it up into 9 separate blocks:

Then when I place them in the editor, the blocks are in multiples of the grid size, so I just draw in the edges, then fill in the whole center region with the middle tile.

I like this method because it allows me to have tiles that overlap each other at the edges and stuff a bit, making it feel a bit more messy and off the grid (literally).

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I’m using Ogmo Editor to design the levels of the game (since FlashPunk doesn’t come with a built-in level building utility). It was made by my friend (and housemate), Matt Thorson, and works wonders, especially for this type of game.
If you’re interested in using Ogmo Editor for your own projects, I actually wrote a getting started tutorial for it, check it out!

I’m using Ogmo Editor to design the levels of the game (since FlashPunk doesn’t come with a built-in level building utility). It was made by my friend (and housemate), Matt Thorson, and works wonders, especially for this type of game.

If you’re interested in using Ogmo Editor for your own projects, I actually wrote a getting started tutorial for it, check it out!

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Yummy! Took a quick sketch break after designing a level.

Yummy! Took a quick sketch break after designing a level.

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The goal of the game is simple, get to the end of each level. Each level has a checkered platform you must reach. For example, in this simple area above, the player must do hops of various sizes, a slide across the ice, followed by a long hop to reach the goal.
I’m working on introducing new platform types and objects with each level that change the way you navigate. For example, the ice platform has no friction, so you’ll just keep sliding on it, so unlike the regular platforms where you can take your time, you’re pressured to jump once you reach the end and make quicker decisions.
There are many more types of platforms and objects I’ll show off as I post more.

The goal of the game is simple, get to the end of each level. Each level has a checkered platform you must reach. For example, in this simple area above, the player must do hops of various sizes, a slide across the ice, followed by a long hop to reach the goal.

I’m working on introducing new platform types and objects with each level that change the way you navigate. For example, the ice platform has no friction, so you’ll just keep sliding on it, so unlike the regular platforms where you can take your time, you’re pressured to jump once you reach the end and make quicker decisions.

There are many more types of platforms and objects I’ll show off as I post more.